Day 1:


Materials:

  1. 4 sheets of Douglas Fir wood: approximately 30 cm by 60 cm

  2. 1 large sheet of plywood: approximately 60 cm by 120 cm

  3. 1 electric jigsaw

  4. 2 clamps

  5. 1 steel file

  6. 1 medium aluminum blade

  7. Sheets of Sandpaper

  8. Gorilla® wood glue



Today was the inception of the S.S. Beastmode‘s construction. First, our group precisely sketched the design out on a sheet of Douglas Fir pinewood to be used as the middle layer and a sketch to cut the other two layers. The three of us cut the wood into the basic shape of the boat that we desire with an electric jigsaw. The next step was to perfect the edges of the layers by using sandpaper, files, and knives. The two outside layers were made of slender cut plywood, in order to even out the weight and make the vessel more buoyant. Lastly, we glued the three together, forming a whole wooden craft. At this time, we wait for the glue to dry, so that we can then paint and attach the bilge pump system to the bottom.



Day 2 & Day 3:


Materials:

-Two 1,000 GPH (Gallons Per Hour) Bilge Pumps: 9 cm by 9 cm

-Zip ties

-1 electric drill

-50 feet of electrical wire

-1 soldering iron

-Lead-free soldering

-2 toggle switches

-Plastic Tub



We began day two by finishing off sanding. Next, we attached the bilge pumps to the three layered boat by drilling 12 holes through the boat to attach the pumps with zip ties. Lastly, we tested our vessel’s buoyancy in a large water tank; the boat successfully floated, and remains at the surface of the water.

    Day three was the start of wiring. To prepare for wiring, we drilled three holes in a plastic tub, which is a stationary controller that holds two toggle switches. Afterward, we cut and placed the wire the desired way, prepared for soldering. We learned the technique of soldering, and will be finished soldering by the end of next class.




Day 4: The final class before Long Beach


Materials:

-Two 1,000 GPH (Gallons Per Hour) Bilge Pumps: 9 cm by 9 cm

-Zip ties

-1 electric drill

-50 feet of electrical wire

-1 soldering iron

-White plastic tubing

-Lead-free soldering

-2 toggle switches

-Plastic Tub



Day four was an immensely productive day of wiring. We started off by soldering the  copper and silver wires to the battery. Since our box and controller have been completed, we were finally able to attach the wires to the switches which were attached to the battery with alligator clips. We then fastened white plastic tubing to the rear of the bilge pumps; the tubing acts like the same bilge pump system found on jet boats. The three of us practically spent the rest of the DEEP class soldering all the wires which will be secured onto other positive or negative right and left wires to the bilge pumps. Although it was a struggle, we are ready to test the boat at the Long Beach pool.


Day 5: Long Beach

   

    Once we arrived at Long Beach we gathered the boat, wires, and controller. We tested our finished project in an Olympic pool 17 feet in depth. Our boat successfully glided across the water as we desired. Conversely, the 12 volt batter was an insufficient source of power. The boat had continuously veered right which causes a major problem in the turning and propulsion of the boat. Another source of error was the weight of all the wiring. The wiring weighed down the boat and turned the boat sharper on one side than the other. In order to fix this, we will apply styrofoam packaging peanuts around parts of the wire, resulting in wire that floats.


Day 6:


Materials:

-PVC Pipe

-Plastic Surf Fin (Rudder)

-Blue PVC Cement

-Electric Drill




    Today we fixed any sort of error that occurred from our trip to Long Beach. We were able to fix the inaccurate turning by attaching a plastic surf fin to the circumference of a PVC pipe with Blue PVC Cement. The fin acts as a stabilizer which prevents the boat from veering out of a straight line. We also readjusted the tubing attached to the bilge pumps to ensure that the boat moves in a straight line when both bilge pumps are generating power.




Day 7: Test Run


Materials:

  1. SS Beastmode Completed!

  2. Stopwatch

  3. Meter Sticks


    Today we ran a 5 meter test course in order to test the handling of the SS Beastmode. The boat was not going as fast as we hoped but the rudder system has almost completely straitened out the path the Boat. The down side to this is that it reduces the speed of the boat. The buoyancy of the boat is great it is staying on the surface no problem. One factor of the reduced speed is that we had not charged the battery in a while so it could have been dead.